Category Archives: Optometry

Vision & Vitamins: Can supplements prevent nearsightedness?

By | Cataracts, Diabetes, Laser Eye Surgery, Laser vision correction, Ophthalmologist, Ophthalmology, Opthamologist, Optometry, science, Vision & Vitamins | No Comments

Nearsightedness (also called myopia) affects from 20% to 50% of North Americans and up to >80% of some populations in Asian countries.  The need for nearsighted correction with glasses or contacts can run in families and is more likely to be present if both parents are myopic.  The natural course of nearsightedness is that it can start in childhood or young adulthood and continue to progress up to age 20 or in higher corrections into the 30’s.

There are some conditions that may be associated with nearsightedness so regular eye examinations are recommended even if the prescription has stopped changing.  Nearsighted people and parents of nearsighted children are of course interested in finding ways to slow or prevent the progression of myopia.  There has been conflicting scientific evidence to support the relationship between reading and near work and higher myopia, however there was no proven association between nearsightedness and computer work.  There has also been some evidence to suggest that more time spent in natural light (outdoors) can help to reduce the increase in prescription over time.

There have been a number of studies to try and find a link between nutrition and nearsightedness and to this date there has not been anything proven to prevent natural progression of myopia in children and adults.

It is important for anyone affected by nearsightedness to have regular eye examinations with and optometrist or ophthalmologist even if the prescription isn’t changing.  Sudden shifts in the degree of nearsightedness can indicate conditions like diabetes or cataracts if changes are happening at an older age.

Correcting nearsightedness is usually involves using glasses or contact lenses.  Laser vision correction can be considered after the prescription has stabilized for at least 2 years.

If you have questions about laser vision correction or wish to book a complimentary evaluation with Dr. Anderson Penno, contact Western Laser Eye Associates.

Western Laser Eye Associates Welcomes Dr. Deepak Khosla, Ophthalmology Associate

By | Blepharitis, Calgary, Cataracts, Dr. Khosla, Dry eye, Eye health, glaucoma, Laser Eye Surgery, Laser vision correction, macular degeneration, Ophthalmologist, Ophthalmology, Opthamologist, Optometry, Photorefractive, PRK, Refractive Surgery, Uncategorized, VISX | One Comment

Western Laser Eye Associates is excited to welcome Dr. Deepak Khosla as the newest member of our eye care team.  Dr. Khosla has a special interest in medical retina and general ophthalmology.  He speaks a number of languages including Hindi, Punjabi, Urdu, and Tamil and has a number of years of experience in ophthalmology.  Urgent eye care problems and new patients are welcome.

Dr. Khosla is a general ophthalmologist which differs from an optometrist in the training and scope of practice.  Ophthalmologists are “Eye MD”s with a medical degree and training in all systems in the human body.  An optometrist has specialized training in eye health and also may have more experience and training in the optics of prescribing glasses and contact lenses.  Western Laser Eye associates has a diverse team including 2 optometrists who specialize in eye health including dry eye, glasses and contact lens prescriptions, and eye muscle testing.  Dr. Khosla joins Dr. Anderson Penno as a second ophthalmologist and together they cover a wide array of eye health problems including screening for diabetic patients and treatment of many common eye diseases such as glaucoma and macular degeneration.  Dr. Khosla and Dr. Anderson Penno also care for urgent conditions including foreign body, eye infections, styes, and retinal tears.

Dr. Khosla offers Saturday appointments for select appointments.  To inquire about an eye health exam call 403.247.1477 or ask your medical doctor to fax a referral to 403.247.9774.

If you have questions about laser vision correction or wish to book a complimentary evaluation with Dr. Anderson Penno, contact Western Laser Eye Associates.

Vision & Vitamins: Ginkgo Biloba, Glaucoma, and Macular Degeneration

By | Epi-lasik, Epilasik, Eye health, FDA, Food for thought, Ginkgo Biloba, glaucoma, Health Canada, Laser Eye Surgery, Laser vision correction, macular degeneration, Mayo Clinic, Ophthalmologist, Ophthalmology, Opthamologist, Optometry, Pubmed, Refractive Surgery, science, Uncategorized, Vision & Vitamins | No Comments

Vitamins and natural herbs have become more and more popular for alternative treatment as additional treatments for medical conditions.  Ginkgo Biloba has been used for centuries as a traditional treatment which may help blood flow to the brain and aid in treatment of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.  It might help treat leg pain that results from blood vessel disease, and there is some suggestion that ginkgo biloba might also help PMS symptoms, depression, multiple sclerosis, and ADHD.  Ginkgo Biloba is extracted from the leaves of the Ginkgo Biloba tree.  As far as vision and eye health are concerned, it is possible that Gingko Biloba might be helpful to eye health but as with many natural products the scientific studies show some favorable and some unfavorable results.

There are some scientific studies that have been reported in the peer reviewed literature which is a data base of articles that have been reviewed by scientists with expertise in the particular field of study before the article is allowed to be published.  Peer review helps to make sure that studies are done in a way that will provide strong statistical evidence for or against a specific area of study.  The most powerful studies are randomized and double-blinded which means the researcher and the subject who is taking the supplement do not know if it is the actual supplement or a placebo being taken.  The “placebo” effect has been well studied and up to 30% of people taking a fake pill who are told it will have beneficial effects will report that it helps whether or not there is any measurable effects.  By double-blinding and using large and randomized numbers of subjects the results will show with more confidence that a particular supplement is helpful or not for a specific condition.  Because there are a lot of different conditions that are being studied, so far there are only a few published peer reviewed scientific studies that have been done to find out if Ginkgo Biloba is good for your eyes.

According to the Mayo Clinic there is some scientific evidence suggesting that Ginkgo Biloba may be helpful in preventing worsening in age related macular degeneration which can lead to central vision loss, but there is little evidence to suggest it might be helpful for treatment of glaucoma.  In the peer reviewed literature there are a few studies including this 2012 study by Cybulska-Heinrich, Mozafferieh and Flammer that suggests supplementation with Ginkgo Biloba might be helpful in addition to traditional medical treatment in cases that are not responding as well as needed to these traditional treatments.  They suggest that antioxidant effects along with a variety of other effects on blood flow might be responsible for the beneficial effects of supplementation with Ginkgo Biloba.  The American Academy of Ophthalmology reported there was a single small randomized trial that showed promise for using Gingko Biloba to slow macular degeneration.

A commonly reported dose of Ginkgo Biloba is a standardized extract, standardized to 24% flavone glycosides and 6% terpene lactones starting at 40 milligrams of that extract three times daily, but there does not seem to be enough evidence in the scientific studies to prove the most effective doses for a specific condition.  Risks and side effects of Ginkgo Biloba supplements include headaches and dizziness, bleeding, and other side effects.  If you are on a blood thinner or aspirin, or are on other medications you should talk to your pharmacist and/or doctor to make sure that there won’t be dangerous interactions.  There is also some question about the quality of the products in some cases and as with all supplements it is important to be sure you are getting a high quality product.  In Canada a DIN or NPH number can be found on products that have been reviewed by Health Canada.  In the US the FDA does not require approval of supplements before the product is marketed but does collect information on adverse events.  The other thing to consider is the cost of a product like Ginkgo Biloba versus the proof that it will be helpful for your health.

Whether you already had LASIK, Intralasik, EpiLasik, PRK, wear glasses or contacts, reading glasses or no glasses at all you should be sure to get regular checks with your eye care specialist (optometrist or ophthalmologist) in order to optimize your vision for the rest of your life.  If you have questions about laser vision correction or wish to book a complimentary evaluation with Dr. Anderson Penno, contact Western Laser Eye Associates.

 

 

Bionic Lens: can everyone have perfect vision?

By | Food for thought, Keratectomy, Laser Eye Surgery, Laser vision correction, LASIK, Optometry, Photorefractive, PRK, Refractive Surgery, Surgeon | No Comments

There has been a lot of talk recently about the “Bionic Lens” which has been invented by an optometrist from British Columbia.  CBC news recently ran a story about the new lens implant.  According to this news story, “Pending clinical trials on animals and then blind human eyes, the Bionic Lens could be available in Canada and elsewhere in about two years, depending on regulatory processes in various countries.”  If there are problems in the back of the eye involving the retina, such as macular degeneration, this lens would not be able to correct the poor vision.  So vision improvement using this lens would be helpful to people who can correct their vision with glasses or contact lenses.  At this time vision correction surgeries are able to allow people to see as well without glasses or contact lenses as they do with their eyewear – for most people they would not be expected to see better than their best corrected vision.

The photographs of the lens looks similar to some of the designs currently available for intraocular lens implants used most frequently in cataract surgery.  It is not clear from the news reports what makes this lens design so revolutionary.  There do not appear to be reports yet in the peer reviewed literature which would fit with the reports that animal and blind human eye trials have not been done yet.  These steps are needed to prove that the lens is safe before proceeding to sighted human eye studies.  In people younger than 45 years old, lens replacement surgery is not usually recommended due to the fact that reading glasses may be required unless a multifocal lens is used or unless one eye is left near-sighted for reading (monovision).

The most common treatment for reducing dependence on glasses in this age range is laser vision correction.  The original photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) techniques were developed in the 1980’s and have been refined over the following decades.  This is still a reliable way to improve uncorrected vision in people who meet the safety criteria including thick enough corneas, prescriptions that are within the range of correction, healthy eyes, and no health problems that might cause problems in healing or risk of infection (such as immunosuppression).  For people younger than 45 but with high corrections outside the range of laser vision correction the implantable contact lens is usually the next option.

Will the Ocumetrics Bionic Lens replace laser vision correction and standard lens implants used for cataract surgery?  The reports are optimistic according to the news stories, but the proof will be coming in the next few years as preliminary studies and then sighted human eye studies are done.  There is a lot of excitement about this new lens implant and if it lives up to expectations it is possible that it may become a common option for vision correction in the future.  For now though, laser vision correction is the first option to consider as a way to reduce the need for glasses or contact lenses.

If you have questions about laser vision correction or wish to book a complimentary evaluation with Dr. Anderson Penno, contact Western Laser Eye Associates.

Ophthalmologist & Optometrist: what does it mean when you are considering PRK or Epi-LASIK?

By | Epilasik, Laser vision correction, LASIK, Optometry, PRK, Refractive Surgery | One Comment

Whether you are looking for general eye health care, eyeglass prescriptions, or laser vision correction such as LASIK, PRK, or Epi-LASIK, it is important to understand who is caring for your eyes.

“Eye Doctor” can mean an ophthalmologist or an optometrist.  The main differences are:

Ophthalmologist

  • has an M.D.
  • has completed 4 years of medical school + 4-5 years of residency
  • some will have completed additional 1-3 years of fellowship training
  • may provide general eye care, surgery, or specialized care
  • sub-subspecialities include: glaucoma, retina, cornea, plastics
  • in addition to surgery, can prescribe a wide range of medications
  • can order specialized testing such as CT, MRI, X-ray, blood work
  • find an Eye MD

Optometrist

  • has an O.D.
  • has completed 4 years of optometry training  in addition to university
  • may provide general eye care as well as prescribing glasses and contacts
  • often will comanage with ophthalmologists
  • can prescribe glasses and contacts and some medications
  • can refer to sub-speciality ophthalmologists such as retina or glaucoma
  • find an optometrist

In many laser vision correction centres the initial assessment is done by an opometrist with experience in refractive surgery.  At Western Laser Eye Associates all potential laser vision correction candidates are seen by an ophthalmologist in order to insure they are a good candidate for surgery.

In some cases it can be helpful to comanage with both an optometrist and ophthalmologist.  For example some people from smaller towns may not have convenient access to an ophthalmologist.  In these cases an optometrist can do preliminary testing to determine if laser vision correction may be an option.  It it is not a good option due to the degree of correction or other eye health issues then it may save the time and travel to attend an assessment.  In cases where laser vision correction is a good option, you may return to your optometrist closer to home for follow up care.

Co-management between an ophthalmologist and optometrist works well for a number of common eye conditions.  The key to successful comanagement is good communication between you, your ophthalmologist, and your optometrist.

If you are interested in booking a complimentary laser vision correction assessment with Dr. Anderson Penno, contact Western Laser Eye Associates.

 

Welcome Dr. M. Purba: experienced in pre & post LASIK, PRK care and general eye health checks

By | Customvue, Epi-lasik, LASIK, Optometry, PRK, Refractive Surgery | No Comments

Western Laser Eye Associates is pleased to welcome Dr. M. Purba to our eye-care team alongside Dr. Anderson Penno, Dr. Boadi and experienced ophthalmic technicians.

Dr. M. Purba brings years of optometry experience in the field of pre & post PRK and LASIK care as well as extensive experience in optometric eye health care to the practice.  She will be available to do general eye exams, prescribe glasses, and provide specialized treatment for conditions such as dry eye, blepharitis, and glaucoma.

Optometrists specialize in the treatment of many eye problems.  They are complimentary to ophthalmologists who are Eye MD’s and often work together with ophthalmologists to co-manage patients.

More information can be found at:

http://www.optometrists.ab.ca/

For more information about services provided by Dr. Purba or to book a complimentary refractive surgery assessment with Dr. Anderson Penno, contact Western Laser Eye Associates.